Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
A value is required.

A value is required.Invalid format.

A value is required.


Slide background


The Show


"Outdoors with Larry Rea" is in its 14th year on the air, broadcasting from Entercom Studios in Memphis, TN. The show's host, Larry Rea, is an expert in Outdoors media, having been the Outdoors Editor for the Memphis Commercial Appeal prior to his move into radio. The show, as well as its website, www.lroutdoors.com, has consistently won awards for excellence in broadcasting, most recently at the annual Southeastern Outdoors Press Association conference. Airing on Saturday mornings, the show features a broad list of segments, including interviews with the most interesting and accomplished Outdoorsmen and women in the U.S. and beyond, but offers a local flavor as well. Larry and his team of show contributors cover the latest news, reports, products and events. In addition to the radio booth, the show hits the road to cover some of the most prestigious events in the industry, such as the Bassmaster Classic, the National Field Dog Trials and more.
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Old And New Waters On B.A.S.S. Nation Schedule For 2015

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Some familiar bass fishing waters and some never visited by B.A.S.S. tournaments will play host to competitors in the 2015 Old Milwaukee B.A.S.S. Nation divisionals.
 
California’s Clear Lake and Mississippi’s Ross Barnett Reservoir are often top choices on the Bassmaster Tournament Trail. But the Pee Dee River Basin in South Carolina and Minnesota’s Vermilion Lake will be hosting B.A.S.S. events for the first time.
 
Anglers who have qualified for the divisionals will have the great fortune to compete on these lakes, and the top competitor from each state will advance to the 2015 Old Milwaukee B.A.S.S. Nation Championship.
 
“It’s really exciting to get to go to new places for the B.A.S.S. Nation divisionals,” said Jon Stewart, director of the B.A.S.S. Nation. “It’s one of the many things that make the Nation unique.
 
“You never know what might happen on these new waters, and I’m ready to get 2015 started to see what the year will bring,” Stewart added.
 
The first divisional of the season is the 2015 Old Milwaukee B.A.S.S. Nation Western Divisional,April 8-10, on California’s famed Clear Lake. B.A.S.S. has visited this lake — one of the oldest natural lakes in North America — 11 times, including a divisional here just two years ago.
 
The Western Divisional in 2013 also took place in early April, and Washington’s Jeremy Percifield won the three-day event with a hefty 67 pounds, 6 ounces. The biggest bass of the tournament, caught by Idaho’s Denton Crofts, was 10 pounds, 9 ounces — a weight competitors will definitely strive to find in April 2015.
 
The last time the Bassmaster Elite Series competed on Clear Lake, Byron Velvick almost hit the 100-pound mark over a four-day tournament, ending with 98 pounds, 6 ounces.
 
The second divisional of the season is 2,893 miles east of Clear Lake only two weeks later. The Southern Divisional will take place on the Yadkin-Pee Dee River Basin in Georgetown, S.C., April 22-24. The watershed is North Carolina’s second-largest. If anglers aren’t familiar with fishing in the basin, they’re certainly familiar with the surrounding water bodies, Lake Norman and High Rock Lake, sites of several Bassmaster Tournament Trail events, including three Bassmaster Classics on High Rock.
 
Next up is Ross Barnett Reservoir in Ridgeland, Miss., for the Central Divisional, June 10-12. Barnett hosted a Bassmaster Classic in 1978, which Bobby Murray won with 37 pounds, 9 ounces over three days for the October event. Just three months prior to the 2015 divisional, the pros from the Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Central Opens presented by Allstate will compete on Ross Barnett, as well.
 
The following week, June 17-19, the B.A.S.S. Nation divisionals move 906 miles northeast to Fairmont, W.Va., for the Mid-Atlantic Divisional on the Monongahela River. The Mon has hosted a B.A.S.S. event once — kind of. The northern end of the river is part of the Three Rivers in Pittsburgh, Pa., site of the 2005 Bassmaster Classic. It was a tough tournament, which Kevin VanDam won with only 12 pounds, 15 ounces over three days.
 
As summer closes, competitors in the Northern Divisional will convene in Minnesota on Vermilion Lake, one of the most scenic lakes in the United States. The 39,000-acre lake could produce mixed bags for the anglers when they visit the fishery Aug. 26-28.
 
The Connecticut River in Hartford, Conn., ends the season at the 2015 Old Milwaukee B.A.S.S. Nation Eastern Divisional, Sept. 18-20. The B.A.S.S. Nation previously held a divisional tournament on the river in 2007. In addition a Bassmaster Top 100 tournament was held there in 1994 during the same week of September. Veteran pro Roland Martin won that one with 49 pounds, 11 ounces over four days.
 
Each state sends a team of its top anglers to its respective divisional. The top angler from each state advances to the B.A.S.S. Nation Championship, which will be held in October or November at a site yet to be selected.
 
2014 B.A.S.S. Nation Title Sponsor: Old Milwaukee

2014 B.A.S.S. Nation Official Sponsors: Toyota, Bass Pro Shops, Berkley, Evan Williams Bourbon, Humminbird, Mercury, Minn Kota, Nitro Boats, Skeeter Boats, Triton Boats, Yamaha
 
2014 B.A.S.S. Nation Supporting Sponsors: Boat US, Booyah, Carhartt, Diet Mountain Dew, Livingston Lures, Lowrance, Plano, Power-Pole, Rigid Industries, Shimano
 
About B.A.S.S.
B.A.S.S. is the worldwide authority on bass fishing and keeper of the culture of the sport. Headquartered in Birmingham, Ala., the 500,000-member organization’s fully integrated media platforms include the industry’s leading magazines (Bassmaster and B.A.S.S. Times), website (Bassmaster.com), television show (The Bassmasters on ESPN2), social media programs and events. For more than 45 years, B.A.S.S. has been dedicated to access, conservation and youth fishing.
 
The Bassmaster Tournament Trail includes the most prestigious events at each level of competition, including the Bassmaster Elite Series, Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Open Series presented by Allstate, Old Milwaukee B.A.S.S. Nation events, Carhartt Bassmaster College Series, Bassmaster High School Series presented by Carhartt, Toyota Bonus Bucks Bassmaster Team Championship and the ultimate celebration of competitive fishing, the GEICO Bassmaster Classic presented by Diet Mountain Dew and GoPro.
 
Slide background
Chad Hoover's "That's Knot Right" to Air

Chad Hoover-host of Knot Right Kayak Fishing on NBC Sports and Kayak Bassin' on The World Fishing Network-is one of the most passionate and talented hunters and anglers that you'll ever meet, and one of the funniest and most entertaining personalities in the outdoor industry. But it's a fact that Chad Hoover sees the world from a different perspective than most, which has earned him the nickname 'Knot Right'. Based out of his HOOK1 fishing store in Nashville, TN, That's Knot Right is a reality show that follows the funny-man on his hunting, fishing, and day-to-day adventures in the southeast.

Season 1 of That's Knot Right has 6 episodes. New episodes will be released on CarbonTV every Tuesday morning, starting Tuesday, November 18th.

Watch the trailer and the pilot episode here: http://www.carbontv.com/shows/thats-knot-right/.

--------------
About That's Knot Right: Chad Hoover-host of Knot Right Kayak Fishing on NBC Sports and Kayak Bassin' on The World Fishing Network- sees the world from a different perspective than most, which has earned him the nickname 'Knot Right'. Based out of his HOOK1 fishing store in Nashville, TN, That's Knot Right follows the funny-man on his day-to-day adventures as a father, outdoorsman, and business owner. That's Knot Right is a CarbonTV exclusive series produced by Heliconia.

About Heliconia: Since World Champion kayaker Ken Whiting founded the company in 1998, Heliconia has been a leader in outdoors media production. Heliconia produces 5 outdoor television series that air on NBC Sports, Universal Sports, Outside Television, and The World Fishing Network. See all of Heliconia's work at www.helipress.com, or follow along on Facebook at www.facebook.com/helipress.
Slide background
Survey: Fishing Remains a Popular Family Activity

FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. — Despite the modern draw of video games and organized sports, the attraction of the wild outdoors and all it has to offer remains as powerful as ever as evidenced by the number of anglers who shared the water with a son, daughter or other child in the past year. Whether spending the day in the comfort of a boat or clutching a rod along a shady bank, fishing remains a popular activity for all ages with up to 66 percent of active anglers reporting they took a child fishing in the past 12 months, according to a recent poll by AnglerSurvey.com. Angling is a great way to enjoy quality one-on-one time with a young person, but it’s also an excellent group activity, too. When asked how many children each angler had taken fishing in the past 12 months, 20 percent said they had taken a single child, while 21 percent took at least two. Nearly 10 percent of anglers reported taking three children fishing, six percent took four and an impressive 10 percent took five or more kids fishing in the past year. Thirty-four percent of those surveyed said they had not taken any children fishing. “Taking a kid fishing is one of life’s more rewarding efforts. Not only is it good for the child and family, it generates a future generation committed to conserving fish and the outdoors,” says Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which designs and conducts the surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com. “We encourage all anglers and the fishing community to get involved in youth fishing efforts and programs such as the RBFF’s Take Me Fishing campaign and others.” Indeed, it looks like an activity that many angling families do enjoy together as 78 percent of those who reported taking a kid fishing said those children were in some way related to them. Forty-four percent were a son or daughter, 17 percent were a grandchild and 17 percent were a niece, nephew or other relative. Twenty-two percent said the child or children they took fishing were not related to them with five percent of those taking them fishing as part of an organized Scouting, church or similar activity. To help continually improve, protect and advance hunting, shooting and other outdoor recreation, all sportsmen and sportswomen are encouraged to participate in the bi-monthly surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and/or AnglerSurvey.com. Every other month, participants who complete the surveys are entered into a drawing for one of five $100 gift certificates to the sporting goods retailer of their choice. About AnglerSurvey.com, HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com: Launched in 2006, AnglerSurvey.com, HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com help the outdoor equipment industry, government fisheries and wildlife officials and conservation organizations track consumer activities and expenditure trends. Survey results are scientifically analyzed to reflect the attitudes and habits of anglers and hunters across the United States. Follow them on Facebook at http://facebook.com/huntersurvey and http://facebook.com/anglersurvey or on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/AnglerSurvey and https://twitter.com/#!/HunterSurvey. About Southwick Associates: Southwick Associates is a market research and economics firm specializing in the hunting, shooting, sportfishing, and outdoor recreation markets. Founded in 1989, Southwick Associates is renowned for delivering comprehensive insights and statistics assisting business and strategic decisions across the entire outdoor industry; from government agencies, industry associations and non-profit organizations, to affiliated businesses and manufacturers. Aside from custom market research, and economic impact studies, Southwick also provides syndicated participation, media consumption, and equipment purchase tracking studies utilizing their three proprietary sportsmen panels. Visit www.southwickassociates.com for more information.
Slide background
Survey: Hunters Still Enjoy Small Game and Upland Hunting

FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. — With more than 10 million hunters pursuing the white-tailed deer in the United States, according to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, this iconic creature reigns supreme as the most hunted species of game animal in North America. Walk by the newsstand in the fall and glance at the covers of outdoor magazines and it would seem deer and other big game are virtually all that is of interest. But that perception would be wrong. In fact, according to a recent study by HunterSurvey.com, about half of sportsmen surveyed said they had hunted small or upland game in the past year. Species such as squirrels, rabbits, quail, pheasants and similar furred and feathered game still draw hunters into our nation’s fields and forests by the millions every year. “Small game and upland hunting often served as a hunter’s first experiences pursuing game before deer, turkey and elk populations became so plentiful; and for many hunters, they still are. With abundant opportunities available to hunt various small game and birds, it would seem interest among many sportsmen is still there,” says Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which designs and conducts the surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com. “For those not pursuing small game, by promoting such hunting we may be able to help expand their hunting opportunities and fun, and thereby increase overall hunting activity.” And what is the type of firearm of choice for these small game hunters? HunterSurvey.com found the low-recoiling rimfire in either .22 caliber or .17 caliber remains a favorite among these sportsmen with 67 percent of those surveyed reporting they used them when hunting. Shotguns remain tops for bird hunting, to no surprise. To help continually improve, protect and advance hunting, shooting and other outdoor recreation, all sportsmen and sportswomen are encouraged to participate in the bi-monthly surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and/or AnglerSurvey.com. Every other month, participants who complete the surveys are entered into a drawing for one of five $100 gift certificates to the sporting goods retailer of their choice. About AnglerSurvey.com, HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com: Launched in 2006, AnglerSurvey.com, HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com help the outdoor equipment industry, government fisheries and wildlife officials and conservation organizations track consumer activities and expenditure trends. Survey results are scientifically analyzed to reflect the attitudes and habits of anglers and hunters across the United States. Follow them on Facebook at http://facebook.com/huntersurvey and http://facebook.com/anglersurvey or on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/AnglerSurvey and https://twitter.com/#!/HunterSurvey. About Southwick Associates: Southwick Associates is a market research and economics firm specializing in the hunting, shooting, sportfishing, and outdoor recreation markets. Founded in 1989, Southwick Associates is renowned for delivering comprehensive insights and statistics assisting business and strategic decisions across the entire outdoor industry; from government agencies, industry associations and non-profit organizations, to affiliated businesses and manufacturers. Aside from custom market research, and economic impact studies, Southwick also provides syndicated participation, media consumption, and equipment purchase tracking studies utilizing their three proprietary sportsmen panels. Visit www.southwickassociates.com for more information.
Slide background


2015 GEICO Bassmaster Classic Field Is Nearly Filled

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — The GEICO Bassmaster Classic — the Super Bowl of Bass Fishing — is not only a must-attend festival for fishing fans, but it is also the crown jewel in a professional angler’s career.
 
For some, just qualifying for the most prestigious event in bass fishing is a dream come true. For others, being in the field is the next step in building a career as a pro. And for the fortunate few who have won it, it is the crowning achievement of a career.
 
Feb. 20-22, 56 anglers will converge in Greenville, S.C., to compete for the title of Bassmaster Classic champion and a share of the $1 million purse. Fifty-five of those qualifiers have been determined. The remaining slot will be filled during the Toyota Bonus Bucks Bassmaster Team Championship to be held on Lake DeGray, Arkansas, Dec. 9-13.
 
The 2015 Bassmaster Classic returns to Lake Hartwell, having been previously contested on the border impoundment between South Carolina and Georgia in 2008. That year, Alton Jones of Lorena, Texas, claimed victory in dramatic fashion.
 
Recently at the 2014 Old Milwaukee B.A.S.S. Nation Championship held on the Ouachita River, Connecticut competitor Paul Mueller bested the rest of the field by a significant margin, taking home the Bryan V. Kerchal Memorial Trophy and his second berth in the Bassmaster Classic. At last year’s Classic, Mueller weighed in a whopping three-day total of 66 pounds, 8 ounces for a second-place finish in his first Classic.
 
Mueller, who represents the Eastern Division of the B.A.S.S. Nation, will be joined by two other repeat qualifiers from 2014 — Coby Carden of Alabama and Jeff Lugar of Virginia. Three Classic rookies qualified through the championship as the highest finishers within their respective divisions: Teb Jones of Mississippi, Steve Lund of Arizona and Troy Diede of South Dakota.
 
Thirty-one Bassmaster Elite Series pros earned their slots through the Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year standings. Headlining that list is 2014 Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year Greg Hackney of Gonzales, La. He earned that title in September at the Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year Championship on Bays de Noc at Escanaba, Mich.
 
Along with the yearly points qualifiers, seven other anglers qualified by winning an Elite Series event in 2014 and Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Opens pro Jacob Wheeler qualified by winning the inaugural BASSfest. Along with those win-and-you’re-in berths from the Elite Series, seven anglers from the Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Opens presented by Allstate also earned the same distinction by winning an event in their division. Two Opens division spots were rolled to the Elite Series points because the champions did not meet the requirement of fishing the entire three-tournament division.
 
In addition, Brett Preuett of the University of Louisiana at Monroe qualified for the Classic through the Carhartt Bassmaster College Series Championship and Classic Bracket competition.
 
All told, with double qualifiers included, the Top 40 pros from the Elite Series and Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year standings have qualified for the 2015 Bassmaster Classic.
 
The competitors will take off daily from the newly renovated Green Pond Landing facility on Hartwell near Anderson, S.C., and daily weigh-ins will be held in Greenville, S.C., in the state-of-the-art Bon Secours Wellness Arena. The ever-popular Bassmaster Classic Outdoors Expo presented by Dick’s Sporting Goods will be held at the 260,000-square-foot TD Convention Center, also in Greenville.
 
Here are a few interesting facts about the 2015 Bassmaster Classic:
 
The 2015 championship marks the first time in 24 consecutive runnings of the event that four-time Classic champion Kevin VanDam will not be in the field. His absence ends his pursuit of Rick Clunn’s record 28 consecutive Bassmaster Classic appearances.
 
For the first time, two “defending champions” will be in the field together. Each year, the angler who won the previous year’s Bassmaster Classic earns an automatic berth into the next year’s event. This year, not only will the 2014 champion Randy Howell be in the tournament, but 2013 winner Cliff Pace — who was granted an exemption for a serious injury shortly before the 2014 Classic — will also be in the field.
 
In addition to Pace and Howell, five other former Classic champions have qualified: Mark Davis (1995), Michael Iaconelli (2003), Chris Lane (2012), Takahiro Omori (2004) and Skeet Reese (2009).
 
Six Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year title-holders will be competing on Lake Hartwell, including Hackney, Davis (1995, 1998 and 2001), Iaconelli (2006), Aaron Martens (2005 and 2013), Reese (2007) and Gerald Swindle (2004).
 
The up-to-date list of 2015 Bassmaster Classic qualifiers as of Nov. 8, 2014 is below:

Casey Ashley
Donalds, S.C.
10th place, AOY

Stephen Browning
Hot Springs, Ark.
Winner, Bassmaster Open
 
Coby Carden
Shelby, Ala.
B.A.S.S. Nation Southern Division
 
Jason Christie
Park Hill, Okla.
Winner, Elite Series event

Keith Combs
Huntington, Texas
6th place, AOY
 
John Crews
Salem, Va.
19th place, AOY

Cliff Crochet
Pierre Part, La.
24th place, AOY
 
Mark Davis
Mount Ida, Ark.
5th place, AOY

Ott DeFoe
Knoxville, Tenn.
winner, Bassmaster Open

Troy Diede
Sioux Falls, S.D.
B.A.S.S. Nation Northern Division
 
Paul Elias
Laurel, Miss.
23rd place, AOY

Edwin Evers
Talala, Okla.
22nd place, AOY

Todd Faircloth
Jasper, Texas
2nd place, AOY

Shinichi Fukae
Palestine, Texas
Winner, Bassmaster Open

Greg Hackney
Gonzales, La.
1st place, AOY

Matt Herren
Ashville, Ala.
16th place, AOY

Brett Hite
Phoenix, Ariz.
Winner, Elite Series event

Randy Howell
Springville, Ala.
2014 Classic champion

Michael Iaconelli
Pitts Grove, N.J.
Winner, Elite Series event

Teb Jones
Hattiesburg, Miss.
B.A.S.S. Nation Central Division
 
David Kilgore
Jasper, Ala.
Winner, Bassmaster Open

Bobby Lane
Lakeland, Fla.
33rd place, AOY

Chris Lane
Guntersville, Ala.
Winner, Elite Series event

Brandon Lester
Fayetteville, Tenn.
28th place, AOY

Jared Lintner
Arroyo Grande, Calif.
8th place, AOY

Bill Lowen
Brookville, Ind.
32nd place, AOY

Justin Lucas
Guntersville, Ala.
11th place, AOY

Jeff Lugar
McGaheysville, Va.
B.A.S.S. Nation Mid-Atlantic Division
 
Steve Lund
Glendale, Ariz.
B.A.S.S. Nation Western Division
 
Aaron Martens
Leeds, Ala.
4th place, AOY

Mike McClelland
Bella Vista, Ark.
Winner, Elite Series event

Andy Montgomery
Blacksburg, S.C.
35th place, AOY

Chad Morgenthaler
Brandon West, Mo.
18th place, AOY

Paul Mueller
Naugatuck, Conn.
B.A.S.S. Nation Eastern Division
 
James Niggemeyer
Van, Texas
27th place, AOY

Takahiro Omori
Emory, Texas
38th place, AOY

Cliff Pace
Petal, Miss.
2013 Classic champion

Brandon Palaniuk
Hayden, Idaho
17th place, AOY

Chad Pipkens
Holt, Mich.
Winner, Bassmaster Open

Cliff Pirch
Payson, Ariz.
36th place, AOY

Jacob Powroznik
Prince George, Va.
Winner, Elite Series event

Brett Preuett
Monroe, La.
Carhartt College Series Classic qualifier

Cliff Prince
Palatka, Fla.
40th place, AOY

Skeet Reese
Auburn, Calif.
7th place, AOY

Dean Rojas
Lake Havasu City, Ariz.
 9th place, AOY

Scott Rook
Little Rock, Ark.
21st place, AOY

Morizo Shimizu
Osaka, Japan
30th place, AOY

Kevin Short
Mayflower, Ark.
39th place, AOY

Van Soles
Haines City, Fla.
Winner, Bassmaster Open

Brian Snowden
Reeds Springs, Mo.
34th place, AOY

Gerald Swindle
Warrior, Ala.
14th place, AOY

Randall Tharp
Port St. Joe, Fla.
13th place, AOY

David Walker
Sevierville, Tenn.
20th place, AOY

Jacob Wheeler
Indianapolis, Ind.
Winner, BASSfest

Andrew Young
Mound, Minn.
Winner, Bassmaster Open

About B.A.S.S.
B.A.S.S. is the worldwide authority on bass fishing and keeper of the culture of the sport. Headquartered in Birmingham, Ala., the 500,000-member organization’s fully integrated media platforms include the industry’s leading magazines (Bassmaster and B.A.S.S. Times), website (Bassmaster.com), television show (The Bassmasters on ESPN2), social media programs and events. For more than 45 years, B.A.S.S. has been dedicated to access, conservation and youth fishing.
 
The Bassmaster Tournament Trail includes the most prestigious events at each level of competition, including the Bassmaster Elite Series, Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Open Series presented by Allstate, B.A.S.S. Nation events, Carhartt Bassmaster College Series, Bassmaster High School Series, Toyota Bonus Bucks Bassmaster Team Championship and the ultimate celebration of competitive fishing, the GEICO Bassmaster Classic presented by Diet Mountain Dew and GoPro.
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background

Arkansas Outdoors

Today’s topics:
Commission accepts land donations for future Mississippi River access
Surprised hunter finds her 9-point deer is a doe
Dedication ceremony held at Spring River dam
Felsenthal draft boating trail plan available for public comment
 
Commission accepts land donations for future Mississippi River access
LITTLE ROCK – Commissioners with the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission last week authorized the agency’s director to accept three donated land parcels, totaling just over three acres, along the Mississippi River in Chicot County. The land is located near the site of the old Greenville Bridge southeast of Lake Village and will be used to construct a boat ramp on the river.
Farmers Grain Terminal, Inc. of Greenville, Mississippi, donated a .45-acre tract and signed a quitclaim deed to the AGFC for 2.23 acres. Billy and Deborah Stobaugh of El Dorado also donated a .35-acre tract at the site.
The Commission also:
*Authorized the Director to complete negotiations, and allow opportunity for public comment, on oil and gas lease agreements with Southwestern Energy Co., Inc. on AGFC lands in Pope and Cleburne counties. The proposed leases will cover 59.4 mineral acres on Rainey WMA in Pope County and two acres on the Dripping Springs Access in Cleburne County. Under the proposed terms, the AGFC will receive an annual $500 lease bonus per mineral acre on each property. On the Dripping Springs Access, the AGFC would receive a one-eighth royalty payment. On the Raney WMA property, the AGFC would receive a one-sixteenth royalty payment. Both leases would be for five year terms.
*Authorized the agency’s director, on behalf of the AGFC, to reconstruct a building on Camp Robinson SUA that was destroyed in the April 27 tornado. The tornado destroyed several structures, barn, kennel, residence, sheds and 300 acres of timber on the SUA.
*Approved a land exchange between the AGFC and the Fort Chaffee Redevelopment Authority at the Janet Huckabee Arkansas River Valley Nature Center in Sebastian County. The AGFC will exchange nine acres for 36.85 acres owned by the redevelopment authority.
*Accepted a donation of 2.07 acres along Horseshoe Lake in Crittenden County south of West Memphis. The land is being donated by Tree Top, LLC of Hughes. The land will be used for public boating access to the lake.
*Honored 18 AGFC employees for their years of service to the state.
 
Surprised hunter finds her 9-point deer is a doe
IDA – The late afternoon sun was sinking when the deer stepped out in front of Maxine Byrd.
Nice set of antlers. She raised her 7mm Magnum rifle, aimed carefully and squeezed the trigger. The deer, 60 yards away, fell dead.
Her son, Terry Byrd, was nearby, and they tagged the deer then moved it to a shed to dress it out. In a few minutes, a surprised Terry said, “Wait a minute. This deer doesn’t have the right parts.”
The nice racked, 9-point deer was a doe.
Sonny Thompson, a biologist with the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, came to the Byrd home, carefully looked over the deer and confirmed that it was a female with a set of antlers most male deer would envy. In spite of the scrambled genders, the deer was large and appeared healthy.
Unusual? Certainly. Cory Gray, AGFC deer program coordinator, said, “This is a female deer with an unusually high level of testosterone. I have seen maybe three of this type of deer. Usually, the antlers are gnarly or in velvet and not fully developed like this one.” Wildlife biologists said these doe rarely give birth to fawns, and Thompson said the doe taken by Byrd was not lactating.
Maxine Byrd is 72 years old and was hunting on her 75-acre place near Ida in Cleburne County. It’s north of Greers Ferry Lake. She is an experienced deer hunter of many years, and this season she had already taken an 8-point buck with her muzzle-loading rifle.
She said, “I really enjoy hunting when the grandkids are out there with me. It was special when one of them got a deer and told me, ‘Grandma, I killed a deer with my own compound bow.’”
Byrd, a widow, and her family work their land to encourage deer and other wildlife. She said, “We put in food plots, and we use deer feeders. We feed both corn and rice bran.”
AGFC officials instructed Maxine to count the deer as a buck since she had tagged it that way. With her earlier 8-point, she has reached the season limit with bucks. “But I can still try for a doe,” she said.
 
Dedication ceremony held at Spring River dam
MAMMOTH SPRING – Renovation and restoration of Dam No. 3 on the Spring River near Mammoth Spring have been completed. Work began earlier this year on the 100-year-old structure. To celebrate completion of the restoration work, a dedication ceremony was held earlier this month.
The dam and gate system provides water for the Jim Hinkle Spring River State Fish Hatchery.  The gate system had been damaged in 2009 and caused trout production at the hatchery to decline.
Construction cost on the repairs totaled $3,150,000.  ASI Constructors, Inc. from Pueblo West, Colorado was the general contractor on the project. Crist Engineers, Inc. of Little Rock was the consulting engineer.
Jim Hinkle Spring River State Fish Hatchery is Arkansas’s only state-owned trout hatchery and produces 1 million catchable-size trout for Arkansas waters annually.
For more information on the hatchery, call 877-625-7521.

Felsenthal draft boating trail plan available for public comment
CROSSETT – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has a draft plan for a non-motorized boating trail through Shallow Lake and Grand Marais in the Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge available for public review and comment. The public comment period will extend from Nov. 19 through Dec. 3, 2014.
A compatibility determination is the end result of a process where the Refuge Manager reviews a proposed use on a refuge and determines whether the use is compatible with the purpose for which the refuge was established.  If determined to be compatible, then the use may be permitted.  If the use is determined incompatible, then it is not permitted to occur on the refuge.  Policy issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in October 2000 requires that compatibility determinations be provided to the public for review and comment. 
When completing compatibility determinations, the Refuge Manager uses professional judgment to determine if a proposed use will materially interfere or detract from the fulfillment of the Service's mission or the purpose of the refuge.
The Draft Compatibility Determination is available on-line at:  http://www.fws.gov/Felsenthal/. Copies also may be obtained by visiting the Felsenthal NWR Headquarters/Visitor Center at 5531 Hwy 82 West in Crossett between 7 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
The public has until Dec. 3, 2014 to provide comments in writing to: Refuge Headquarters/Visitor Center. Comments may be sent by fax to 870-364-3757 or by e-mail toMichael_Stroeh@fws.gov.  Comments received will be reviewed and, if appropriate, incorporated into the Final Compatibility Determination, which is expected by early 2015.
Individuals who submit comments will be notified upon completion of the Final Compatibility Determination for the proposed use. While visiting the Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge tune your radio to 1620 AM or follow on Facebook at South Arkansas Refuge Complex for more refuge information. For more information or to speak with the staff, contact Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge at 870-364-3167.
 
Boating education class schedule
Click here for boating education information: http://www.agfc.com/education/Pages/EducationBoating.aspx.
 
Hunter education class schedule
Click here for hunter education information: http://www.agfc.com/education/Pages/EducationHunter.aspx.
 
What’s open for hunting
Click here for hunting season information: http://www.agfc.com/hunting/Pages/HuntingSeasons.aspx.
 
Coming up in the outdoors
Click here for information on programs, meetings and other things to do in the outdoors: http://www.agfc.com/Pages/eventsAll.aspx.
 
For the latest in Arkansas Game and Fish Commission information go to www.agfc.com or call the Wildlife Information Hotline, 800-440-1477.
Slide background

John Berry Fishing Report

During the past week, we have had a couple of rain events (less than an inch here in Cotter), slightly warmer temperatures and heavy winds (to include lake wind advisories). The lake level at Bull Shoals fell seven tenths of a foot to rest at six feet below seasonal power pool of 659 feet. This is forty two feet below the top of flood pool. Upstream, Table Rock rose one tenth of a foot to rest at six and two tenths feet below seasonal power pool and twenty and two tenths feet below the top of flood pool. Beaver Lake fell five tenths of a foot to rest at seven and one tenth feet below seasonal power pool or sixteen and seven tenths feet below the top of flood pool. On the White, we had moderate generation in the afternoon and lower generation in the morning with limited wadable water. Norfork Lake fell two tenths of a foot to rest at four and five tenths feet below seasonal power pool of 553.7 feet and thirty and seven tenths feet below the top of flood pool. On the Norfork, we had wadable water every day with limited generation most mornings.
 
The water level for the top of power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes on this system are well below seasonal power pool. With temperatures moderating, we should receive more wadable water.
 
The Catch and Release section below Bull Shoals Dam will close from November 1, 2014 to January 31, 2015 to accommodate the brown trout spawn. The State Park will be seasonal Catch and Release for the same period. All brown trout must be immediately released. In addition, night fishing is prohibited in this area during this period.
 
On the White, the hot spot was Rim Shoals. The hot flies were olive woolly buggers (#8, #10), Y2Ks (#14, #12), prince nymphs (#14), zebra midges (black with silver wire and silver bead or red with silver wire and silver bead #16, #18), pheasant tails (#14), ruby midges (#18), root beer midges (#18), pink and cerise San Juan worms (#10), and sowbugs (#16). Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective (try a flashback beadhead pheasant tail nymph with a ruby midge or red fan tail midge suspended below it).
 
Conventional wisdom states that hopper fishing ends with the first frost (we had several heavy frosts this past week). I reject this idea and fish them during the winter. I favor shorter leaders (seven and a half foot 3X) and a stiff six weight rod to proper deliver these weighty flies. My favorite flies are Dave’s hoppers (#10) and the western pink lady (#8). To increase hook ups I always use a dropper. I am currently using a ruby or root beer midge in size eighteen on a three foot or longer tippet (depending on the depth of the water I am fishing).
 
The higher flows that we have been getting on some afternoons have been conducive to fishing large streamers. You need a fast sinking sink tip line and an eight weight or better rod. This is a heavy lift that requires casting skills and patience.
 
The Buffalo National River and Crooked Creek are clear. With the colder weather, the smallmouths are not active. Carefully check the water level before entering Crooked Creek or the Buffalo River. There are no dams on these streams. They both have large drainages and are prone to flooding during and following any rain event. The water can rise very quickly.
 
 
The Norfork River has fished well recently. With the holiday, there will be more pressure on the Norfork.  The most productive flies have been small midge patterns (#18, #20, #22)  like ruby midges, root beer midges, zebra midges (black or red with silver wire and silver bead) and soft hackles (#14, #16) like the green butt. Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective. Try a small bead headed nymph (zebra midge, copper John or pheasant tail) suspended eighteen inches below a brightly colored San Juan worm (hot fluorescent pink or cerise #10). There have been reliable hatches of small midges (try a size 24 Adams parachute) and caddis (try a size 18 elk hair caddis).The fishing is better in the morning and late afternoon and tapers off midday.
 
 The siphon at Norfork Dam that was installed to achieve minimum flow has malfunctioned again due to the failure of a sensor on the lake side. It will take three to four weeks to repair it. In the meantime, the powerhouse personnel will run a speed no load operation to achieve minimum flow.
 
With the holidays and warmer weather, there is more fishing pressure on Dry Run Creek. Fish it early or late to avoid the crowds. The hot flies have been sowbugs (#14), Y2Ks (#12) and various colored San Juan worms (worm brown, red, hot fluorescent pink and cerise #10). While you are there take a few minutes to visit the adjacent Norfork national Fish Hatchery. It is fascinating. Be sure and remove your waders before entering to prevent the spread of aquatic diseases.
 
The water on the Spring River has cleared somewhat. This is a great place to wade fish, when they are running water on the White and Norfork Rivers. Canoe season is over and there are fewer boats on the river to interfere with your fishing. Be sure to wear cleated boots and carry a wading staff. There is a lot of bedrock that can get very slick. The hot flies have been olive woolly buggers with a bit of flash (#10), cerise and hot pink San Juan worms (#10) and Y2K (#10)s.
 
Remember that the White and Norfork Rivers and Dry Run Creek are infected with didymo, an invasive alga. Be sure and thoroughly clean and dry your waders (especially the felt soles on wading boots) before using them in any other water. Many manufacturers are now making rubber soled wading boots that are easier to clean and are not as likely to harbor didymo.
 
John Berry is a fly fishing guide in Cotter, Arkansas and has fished our local streams for over thirty years.
 
 
 
 
CRISP FALL DAY ON DRY RUN CREEK
BY JOHN BERRY
Yesterday I had a guide trip on Dry Run Creek with Banks (an old family name) and his dad, Edgar. They are from Jackson, Mississippi and it was Banks first day fly fishing. Dad is an experienced angler but had not been fishing in several years. He thought that it would be a good idea to hire me to get Banks started right and give him a bit of a refresher. We decided to take them to Dry Run Creek in the morning and end the day wading the Norfork River to give Dad a chance to catch a few fish.
 
I picked them up at River Ridge Inn at 7:30 AM. They already had their waders on and were ready to go. It was a cold start (about forty one degrees) but promised to warm up to the mid fifties by mid afternoon. The problem was that there was a lake wind advisory. I knew that the wind would be of no concern on Dry Run Creek because it is in a tight valley and we would be shielded from the wind speed of twenty five miles per hour. We were the first car in the parking lot.
 
I loaned Banks a pair of wool fingerless gloves. He had a pair of full fingered gloves but we figured that the fingerless gloves would be more effective for fishing. I took a few minutes to rig his rod and we were on the creek in no time. We went to one of my favorite spots and waded out into the creek. I stood by Banks and worked on his casting, mending and hook setting as he fished. His skills began to improve and he hooked his first fish. It was a huge brown and it broke off in no time. I prefer that my young first timers hook and catch several smaller fish before they tackle a big one.
 
The next trout was a fat fourteen inch rainbow and we managed to net it. Over the next hour he hooked and landed several nice trout. When he lost one, I explained what he had done wrong and how to avoid it. When he made a good cast or a good hook set I praised him. He hooked another big brown and had it on for about five minutes before the big trout wrapped a log and broke off. The next fish was different. It was a fat twenty two inch brown. This time Banks performed flawlessly. It was in the net in a few minutes. We stopped for a few photos and decided to try another spot.
 
We walked upstream and waded out into the creek. The action was hot. We landed fish after fish. After a while Banks wanted to take a break. When you are working with young anglers, it is important to let them set the pace. I did not want to burn him out on his first day. When he was ready I handed him the rod and he made a perfect cast. It drifted about ten feet and the strike indicator went down. He set the hook. Suddenly the surface of the water exploded with a huge rainbow jumping two feet out of the water. The fight was on. I grabbed my big boat net and got ready to net the fish of the day. It went on for several minutes and Banks did everything right. The big bow reluctantly slid into the net.
 
We stopped to pose for a photo. The trout was just too much for Banks to handle and we did not want to injure it. I had Dad hold it and took a picture of Banks the trout and dad together. This would become a family memory for years to come! We fished our way out and Banks picked up a few more trout but nothing like the big brown. It was noon and he thought that he had caught enough trout.
 
We loaded up and drove to the Ackerman Access. After a quick shore lunch we waded up into the Catch and release section and spent the afternoon fishing. Dad caught several and I worked with Banks on his casting. We quit around 4:00 PM and headed for the lodge.
 
It had been a stellar day for Banks and his dad. They had a great time and we got a young angler enthused about fly fishing.
Slide background
TWRA News

TWRA SETS 2014-15 WINTER TROUT STOCKING SCHEDULE

NASHVILLE --- The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has announced its 2014-15 winter trout stocking scheduled. TWRA plans to release approximately 90,000 rainbow trout into Tennessee waters from December through March.
The program provides numerous close to home trout fishing opportunities for anglers during the winter months. These fisheries also provide a great opportunity to introduce children or first-time anglers to fishing.
The trout will average about 10 inches in length. The daily creel limit is seven, but there is no size limit.
Please note that the dates and locations are subject to change. Updates can be found on TWRA’s website at www.tnwildlife.org.
2014-15 TWRA Winter Trout Stocking Schedule
December 2014
Day                  Location                                              City
2                      Tuesday           Shelby Bottoms Park                           Nashville
2                      Tuesday           Sulphur Fork Creek                             Springfield
3                      Wednesday     Cumberland Mt. State Park                Crossville
3                      Wednesday     West Fork Stones River                      Murfreesboro
4                      Thursday         Lafayette City Park                            Lafayette
4                      Thursday         Marrowbone Lake                               Joelton
5                      Friday              Lake Graham                                      Jackson
5                      Friday              Percy Priest Tailwaters                        Nashville
9                      Tuesday           Cameron Brown Lake                         Germantown
9                      Tuesday           Edmund-Orgill Park                           Millington
9                      Tuesday           Shelby Farms                                      Memphis
9                      Tuesday           Johnson Park Lake                              Collierville
10        Wednesday     Martin City Pond                                            Martin
10        Wednesday     Union City Old Reelfoot Packing Site           Union City
10        Wednesday     Paris City Park                                                Paris
10        Wednesday     McKenzie City Park                                       McKenzie
10        Wednesday     Cane Creek Park                                             Cookeville
10        Wednesday     Stone Bridge Park                                           Fayetteville
10        Wednesday     Billy Dunlop Park                                           Clarksville
11        Thursday         Kingston Springs Park                                    Kingston Springs
11        Thursday         J.D. Buckner Park                                           Dickson
11        Thursday         Davies Plantation and Yale Road Park          Bartlett
11        Thursday         Munford City Park                                         Munford
12        Friday              Nice Mill                                                         Smyrna
12        Friday              Harpeth River                                                 Franklin
12        Friday              McCutcheon Creek                                         Spring Hill
16        Friday              Beech Lake                                                     Lexington

January 2015  

  2        Friday              Oneida City Park                                            Oneida
2        Friday              East Fork Shoal Creek                                    Lawrenceburg
2        Friday              Percy Priest Tailwaters                                    Nashville
6        Thursday         Lake Junior                                                     Nashville
8        Thursday         Lake Graham                                                  Jackson
9        Friday              Nice Mill                                                         Smyrna
13        Tuesday           Cameron Brown Lake                                     Germantown
13        Tuesday           Shelby Farms                                                  Memphis
13        Tuesday           Johnson Park Lake                                          Collierville
14        Wednesday     Beech Lake                                                     Lexington
14        Wednesday     McKenzie City Park                                       McKenzie
14        Wednesday     Martin City Pond                                            Martin
14        Wednesday     Union City Old Reelfoot Packing Site           Union City
14        Wednesday     Paris City Park                                                Paris
15        Thursday         Munford City Park                                         Munford
15        Thursday         Davies Plantation and Yale Road Park          Bartlett
15        Thursday         Big Rock Greenway                                       Lewisburg
16        Friday              Duck River at Fisherman’s Park                     Shelbyville
16        Friday              Duck River at Riverside Dam                         Columbia
20        Tuesday           Cowan City Park                                            Cowan
21        Wednesday     Cane Creek Park                                             Cookeville
22        Thursday         Shelby Bottoms Park                                      Nashville
23        Friday              McCutcheon Creek                                         Spring Hill
23        Friday              Harpeth River                                                 Franklin          
29        Thursday         Lafayette City Park                                        Lafayette
30        Friday              West Fork Stones River                                  Murfreesboro
30        Friday              Percy Priest Tailwaters                                    Nashville

February 2015

 4         Wednesday     Sulphur Fork Creek                                         Springfield
5         Thursday         Billy Dunlop Park                                           Clarksville
5         Thursday         Stone Bridge Park                                           Fayetteville
6         Friday              Nice Mill                                                         Smyrna
11        Wednesday     Lake Junior                                                     Chattanooga
12        Thursday         Pickett Lake, Pickett State Park                     Jamestown
12        Thursday         Kingston Springs Park                                    Kingston Springs
12        Thursday         J.D. Buckner Park                                           Dickson
13        Friday              Marrowbone Lake                                           Joelton
19        Thursday         Cowan City Park                                            Cowan
20        Friday              McCutcheon Creek                                         Spring Hill
20        Friday              Harpeth River                                                 Franklin
26        Thursday         Big Rock Greenway                                       Lewisburg
27        Friday              Percy Priest Tailwaters                                    Nashville

March 2015

 4                     Wednesday     Sulphur Fork Creek                             Springfield
6                     Friday              Nice Mill                                             Smyrna
11                    Wednesday     East Fork Shoal Creek                        Lawrenceburg
13                    Friday              Duck River at Riverside Dam             Columbia
19                    Thursday         Shelby Bottoms Park                           Nashville
19                    Thursday         Cowan City Park                                  Cowan
20                    Friday              McCutcheon Creek                              Spring Hill
20                    Friday              Harpeth River                                      Franklin


SARP CELEBRATES DECADE OF AQUATIC HABITAT CONSERVATION

Accomplishments and Successes Detailed in Newly Released Anniversary-Edition Report
NASHVILLE – Shafts of early morning sun filter through forest cover in the Appalachian Highlands. The sunlight catches a glint of swirling line as an angler casts for brook trout in a recently restored stream.
A tiny rush darter finds improved habitat among the riffles and eddies of a restored creek in
Winston County, Alabama where excessive sedimentation once placed it in peril of being listed
as an endangered species. The creek has one of the last surviving populations of rush darters in
the world.

A freshwater mussel has been found in a restored section of Raccoon Creek, Georgia, making a
rare reappearance after years of absence. While not yet endangered, the mussel, a harbinger of
water quality, hasn’t been seen in the creek for years.

The low grumble of an engine and the sound of lapping waves signals the arrival of anglers
looking for a black bass in a backwater area of the lower Arkansas River where a sediment
barrier has recently been removed, reconnecting fish and anglers to a much-loved fishing hole.

Paddling past a restored spring now reconnected to Florida’s Hillsborough River, a kayaker
surprises a manatee drawn to the fresh free-flowing water.

These are just a few success stories in a decade-long regional effort in the Southeastern United States, led by the Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership (SARP) to preserve globally significant aquatic species and the habitats they need to survive before they are lost forever. In 2004, 14 state fish and wildlife agencies signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that acknowledged their official SARP membership and participation to leverage resources and expertise to strengthen conservation of fish and other aquatic resources. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has been a SARP partner since its inception. The conservation vision of Gary Myers, former Director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, SARP was established, “to do for fish what the North American Waterfowl Management Plan did for ducks.” In the 1980s when waterfowl populations plummeted to record lows, the governments of Canada and the United States developed a strategy to restore waterfowl populations through habitat protection, restoration and enhancement. With the support and involvement of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (SEAFWA), the National Fish Habitat Partnership, and a variety of federal agencies, councils and commissions, conservation organizations and businesses, SARP has served as a successful catalyst and network builder for habitat restoration, conservation and scientific research in the southeastern United States.   

These accomplishments and featured habitat conservation case studies, including Duck River water quality and habitat improvements are recognized in a recently released 10-year anniversary report titled, "Conserving Fish Habitat From the Rivers to the Sea: The Story of the Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership.” This report can be read in its entirety by visiting
http://www.southeastaquatics.net/resources/sarps-special-reports/conserving-fish-habitat-from-rivers-to-the-sea-the-story-of-the-southeast-aquatic-resources-partnership-1/view.

For more information about SARP's partners, programs and conservation successes, please visit
SARP on the Web at www.southeastaquatics.net or contact Lindsay Gardner, SARP Program &
Communications Manager at lindsayg@southeastaquatics.net.
The mission of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is to preserve, conserve, manage, protect, and enhance the fish and wildlife of the state and their habitats for the use, benefit, and enjoyment of the citizens of Tennessee and its visitors. 
The Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership (SARP) will, with partners, protect, conserve and restore aquatic resources, including habitats throughout the Southeast, for the continuing benefit, use and enjoyment of the American people. SARP’s collaborative, regional, multi-agency approach galvanizes the efforts of state and federal agencies, conservation organization and businesses to conserve aquatic habitats from whitewater to bluewater, from rivers to the sea. To learn more about SARP visit www.southeastaquatics.net.

Slide background
Primitive Weapons Season for Deer Opens December 2

JACKSON – The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP) reminds hunters that the statewide Primitive Weapons Season for deer opens December 2 and runs through December 15 in all three Deer Management Zones.  Antlerless deer and zone-legal bucks are eligible for harvest.  Hunters may take one legal buck per day not to exceed three per license year.  On private lands, the antlerless deer bag limit is five per license year with no daily limit.  On U.S. Forest Service lands, the antlerless bag limit is one per day, not to exceed three per year.

 

On private lands only, deer hunters may use any firearm during all open Primitive Weapons Seasons after November 30.  This regulation change was made during the 2013 Legislative Session but will be implemented beginning with the 2014 – 2015 deer hunting season.  This new regulation will give more flexibility to private land managers who manage deer herds on their property and will give more choices to hunters regarding which firearm to use.  Additionally, hunters required to have a hunting license must possess a valid Primitive Weapon License, Sportsman’s License, or Lifetime Sportsman’s License to take advantage of this new opportunity.

 

Additional legal weapons for the statewide Primitive Weapons Season are primitive firearms and archery equipment.  “Primitive Firearms,” for the purpose of hunting deer, are defined as single or double barreled muzzle-loading rifles of at least .38 caliber; OR single shot, breech loading, metallic cartridge rifles (.35 caliber or larger) and replicas, reproductions, or reintroductions of those type rifles with an exposed hammer; OR single or double barreled muzzle-loading shotguns, with single ball or slug.  All muzzle-loading Primitive Firearms must use black powder or a black powder substitute with percussion caps, #209 shotgun primers, or flintlock ignition.  If the hunter is required to have a hunting license, the hunter must possess a valid Primitive Weapon License, Sportsman’s License, or a Lifetime Sportsman’s License.

 

Hunters can find information about the three Deer Management Zones, season dates, and hunting regulations at www.mdwfp.com or in the 2014 – 2015 Mississippi Outdoor Digest.  Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mdwfp or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MDWFPonline.

Slide background

Clagett Talley Pickwick Lake Fishing Report

Pickwick Lake Elevation 413.5
Water Temp.
BASS
Bass are still easy to catch right now which is good considering about all other species are hard. And I am proud to say that the smallmouth bite is on right now. I have had really successful  smallmouth trips lately.
I have been catching a lot more fish in the Savannah area than I have in the lake. You can catch a lot of fish in below the Dam if the Dam is generating water. It is fairly easy to catch a lot of bass on Strike King Seriers 3 Crank Baits and grubs along the river banks. You just drift and cast to the bank, retrieve your bait back to the boat slowly. You can also drift with small split shots and live minnows if you like to use live bait. Fish a lot of rocky bluffs and chunky rocks, also fish some trees that have fallen in the water and believe it or not fish some plain looking muddy banks especially if they have something unique about them. If you cover enough of the river bank using these baits you are sure to catch a lot of bass right now, just remember the generation from the Dam is the key. You can get that next day predicted schedule by going to my website .
White bass
White bass are still running as usual but spotted are actually easier to catch. Right now I am even using the same technique for both white bass and spotted bass. The smaller white grubs defiantly out perform the other baits.
Stripers
I have not fished for stripers in over a week, I have been busy bass fishing. I can say for the last few weeks it has been tough catching a few stripers as expected for this time of year. I did catch a few fish on a Strike King Spoons in Sexy Shad Color which works pretty good this time of year if you are wanting to go striper fishing.
Sauger
I am happy to hear from a lot of fishermen that sauger are already biting good. I hope this means we have a good year ahead of us. I think most people are using minnows on standard sauger jigs. I often use minnow too but I will stubbornly use sassy shad until I see live bait outperforming artificial baits. They are coming out of different depths , anywhere from 15-50'.
 
www.pickareaguide.com. Compliments of Clagett Talley 731-607-5266
Slide background

Gary Harlan Pickwick Lake Fishing Report

Pickwick Lake December Forecast
November 15, 2014
 
Water Temp: mid to upper 50’s
Clarity: 2-6’
 
   With the recent arctic vortex, front or blast the water temps have really taken a nose dive.  Looking at next week’s forecast, water temps will drop even lower as the mean temperature is forecast to be in the upper 30’s. We might have water temps in the upper 40’s by the first of December. The lake needs a shad kill really bad right now. There are so many shad in the lake it has made it difficult to see some of the brush piles and stumps I Crappie fish around this time of year.
   We have been catching a few bass on jigs and soft plastics fished very slowly. I would advise anyone coming to Pickwick to bass fish should have their jerkbaits, A-rigs and flat-sided crankbaits with them. The flat-sided crankbaits have a different wiggle than regular crankbaits. They have a much tighter and more subtle wiggle. On warmer days fishermen should still be able to catch some bass on lipless crankbaits. I use a Strike King Red Eye 100% of the time. These are great “search baits”, you can jig them off deep points as well. Once you locate the fish try a jig and Carolina-rig to thoroughly cover the area. Smaller more compact baits on the Carolina rigs have produced better recently.
The Crappie bite is picking up! We have had some good trips in the past 2 weeks. This bite should get better on through December. 1/16 and 1/8 oz. Jig heads and a Strike King lightning shad are the ticket. I have been fishing them around stumps and brush in 15-28 feet of water. I have some open days in December if you are interested.
Roger, Sharon and I would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and say thanks to all that made 2014 a great year for us! We look forward to seeing you again in 2015. www.fishpickwick.com or www.facebook.com/cptgaryharlan
Gary: 901-413-2650, Roger: 662-423-3869 (after 11:00a.m. please)
Slide background

Steve McCadams Kentucky Lake Fishing Report

ANGLERS RIDE WAVES OF WEATHER PATTERNS

By Steve McCadams

 

    Kentucky Lake’s fall fishing scene this week started off with above average temperatures and mellowed out at midweek but the weekend forecast indicates a dose of winter weather may enter the picture. In fact, a big change in temperatures is already in progress.

    From windy, warm and wet to cold, crisp mornings; that’s what anglers have encountered this week as it has been a roller coaster of conditions. In-between the extremes were a few days of nice normal weather and both crappie and bass fishermen took advantage of it.

    Lake levels this week slept around the winter pool mark and haven’t fluctuated much. Elevation for the weekend will be in the 354.8 range at Kentucky Dam. Upstream at New Johnsonville lake levels will be in the 354.6 range. Water color remains clear.

    Surface temperatures warmed slightly to start the week off in the 67 degree range but cooled to 65 at midweek. Watch for a two or three degree drop by the weekend as the cold front will pull surface temps back into the low 60’s.

    Crappie fishing was fair this week but anglers had to battle more wind than they bargained for. Fall isn’t normally a season of unstability but it seems conditions have rotated with one or two nice days each week sandwiched in-between several days of unruly weather. 

    A few good size fish were taken in 8 to 12 foot depths and some had even moved up to 6 to 7 foot depths in the Paris Landing sector. A few boats were still working main lake ledges at times and finding some scattered fish in 10 to 14 foot water but windy days kept a lot of boats off main lake areas where whitecaps were dancing.

    Jigs tipped with Berkley crappie nibbles seem to be the bait of choice, although some fish were opting or live minnows at times.

    The overall crappie bite lately has been a bit off as numbers have been a bit below average. On days when light winds and cloud cover were present the fishing improved.

    Bass fishermen are still finding enough action to keep them interested but that too has been a bit below average as the bass have been sluggish as have the crappie.

    Some topwater action was underway in the early mornings and late afternoons as fish moved up on shallow gravel banks in hot pursuit of shad. Shallow running crankbaits were still productive on rocky points and along gravel as were some suspending jerk baits.

    A few bass were showing up in the backs of bays where aquatic vegetation was present. Some schooling activity was taking place and anglers tossing rattle trap style lures and some spinnerbaits were scoring.

    Grassbeds are still abundant along the main river shorelines and island rims. Bass are still relating to the grass too.

    A few boats continue to toss big crankbaits, Carolina rigs and Alabama rigs, and jig and pig combos on drop-offs as well.

    Although a drastic weather change will put a chill in the air this weekend, it appears mild weather will return by early next week as temps are expected to rebound back to the mid to upper 60’s soon.

Slide background
Ducks Unlimited News

Duck Stamp Act of 2014 passes Senate, awaits president’s signature

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – Dec. 2, 2014 – In a major win for wetlands and waterfowl conservation, the U.S. Senate passed the Duck Stamp Act of 2014 today. This critically important conservation legislation increases the cost of the federal duck stamp from $15 to $25, and now awaits President Obama’s signature.

“With the assistance of Sen. David Vitter and his leadership in helping pass the Duck Stamp Act of 2014, much-needed funding has been secured for wetlands and waterfowl conservation,” said Ducks Unlimited CEO Dale Hall. “The additional duck stamp funding provided by waterfowl hunters and other conservationists will not only conserve critical waterfowl habitat, but will also help ensure the future of our waterfowling traditions.”

Since 1991 – the last time the price of the duck stamp was increased – its purchasing power has declined due to inflation and rising land costs. The Duck Stamp Act of 2014 would build on this program’s long tradition of helping to conserve vital waterfowl habitat across America, especially in the Prairie Pothole Region, one of the continent’s most important production areas.

“This is huge news for conservation and duck hunters,” said Sen. Vitter of Louisiana. “As we move forward to conserve millions of acres of waterfowl habitat, it's important to remember the mutually beneficial relationship between our nation's sportsmen and ducks. This legislation boosts conservation efforts, which in turn directly impacts the success of duck hunters in near and future hunting seasons.”

Since the federal duck stamp’s introduction in 1934, it has raised more than $750 million and has conserved more than 6 million acres of waterfowl habitat.

For more information, visit www.ducks.org.

Slide background
Louisville Slugger, Realtree Collaborate for Personalized Camo Bats

LOUISVILLE, KY - Louisville Slugger, the Official Bat of Major League Baseball® and the number one name in bats for 130 years, has an exclusive new collaboration with Realtree®, the leader in camouflage products for those who love the outdoors. It's the Realtree™ Camouflage Bat, and it makes an awesome gift because you can personalize it with a name or special message.

Each Realtree Camouflage Bat from Louisville Slugger is 34 inches long and is made from high grade maple. The bats are covered in Realtree Xtra® Green camo print, applied with a state of the art Hydrographic Finishing process that creates a durable high gloss finish. Louisville Slugger's Realtree camo bats are completed with precision laser engraving to create a beautiful and unique souvenir for any outdoorsman.

"Anyone who gets a personalized Realtree camo bat from Louisville Slugger is going to be proud to display it in their man cave, office, family room or den," said Louisville Slugger Director of Specialty Bat Sales Packy Page. "We've even heard guys say they can't wait to put their camo bat on their gun rack in their trucks. That'll be pretty cool to see."

Louisville Slugger is the expert when it comes to finding trees for making baseball bats. The storied company has made more than 100-million bats since it started in 1884.

"We appreciate the passion so many people have for being outdoors because being in the forest is in our DNA at Louisville Slugger," Page said. "So, with the millions of people who hunt, fish, hike, and just love being outdoors, this collaboration with Realtree was a natural step for us at Louisville Slugger."

Personalized Realtree Camouflage Bats from Louisville Slugger are available at www.sluggergifts.com and sell for $89.99, including standard shipping. Camo bat orders ship within 3 to 5 business days. Orders must be placed by December 10 to receive in time for the Holidays.

Slide background
"OK, that's probably not what Lee Marvin is saying in the movie "death hunt", but if thermacell had been around back then..."

Bedford, MA (November 2014)—During a record-breaking time with frigid temperatures, mounds of snow and blizzards across the country, people still have to get out and go to work, attend school, shovel snow, and even sit in the stands to watch football. We can't stop our daily routine, but we can make choices to be comfortable during these conditions. ThermaCELL Heated Insoles, and ProFLEX Heated Insoles can help you stay warm from head to toe.

"When your feet are cold, the rest of your body is miserable, whether you're out working, watching a ball game, sitting in a tree stand or any other outdoor activity," said Josh Silvia, marketing manager for ThermaCELL Heated Insoles. "Our products give you the capability of staying warm, so you can handle the cold elements for many hours."

Both ThermaCELL Heated Insoles products have temperature settings controlled by a wireless remote, allowing for easy temperature adjustment without removal from shoes or boots, ultimately offering convenience as well as comfort. The wireless remote control allows the user to choose from two temperature settings (Medium or High), as well as no heat. They are also equipped with high-tech wireless thermal technology and boast many benefits.

ThermaCELL Heated Insoles are the leader in comfort technology, featuring these benefits:
Regulated Heat—Advanced heat sensors maintain consistent temperature up to five hours per charge.
Remote Control—Easily adjust temperature settings with a small wireless remote.
Three Temperature Settings—Select Medium, High or No Heat, on the remote control to maintain desired temperature
Wireless and Rechargeable—Lithium-Ion Polymer batteries fully recharge in less than four hours and are completely wireless, requiring no external straps or packs
Water Resistant—Insoles are protected against moisture and perspiration
Custom Fit—Insoles come in five sizes and can be trimmed to fit most types of boots and shoes
Quality Tested—SATRA, a worldwide leader in footwear research and development, tested ThermaCELL Heated Insoles for durability and heating

 

Wireless Remote Control Benefits include:
Designed to hang from belt, keychain or zipper
Small enough to easily fit in pocket
Activates insoles and allows the user to select from two temperature settings plus no heat
Controls the insoles from a distance up to seven feet away
Programmed to control one specific pair of insoles and works in a variety of environments

Sizing
Both styles of ThermaCELL Heated Insoles are customizable to fit any shoe size from women's 4.5 to a men's 14, and are available in: small medium, large, x-large and xx-large

The ProFLEX Heated Insoles have all of the benefits of ThermaCELL Heated Insoles, with additional product features including:
One-of-a-kind—The only insoles on the market today with removable, rechargeable batteries and remote control operation.
Rechargeable, removal battery—The battery can easily be changed without removing insole from footwear. Simply pull out the battery and replace with a spare for extended heat. Additionally, the battery is covered in Poron, an antimicrobial, shock-absorbing cushion.
USB or Wall Charging—Wall charger is included, and contains a USB cable so insoles can be charged from any USB powered port or wall outlet. The cable on the battery charger can be disconnected and used as a protective carrying case for the batteries.
Highly Water Resistant—Insoles are highly water resistant to protect electronics from moisture and perspiration, and were manufactured using a unique protection process.
Advanced Comfort—Created with a superior material for advanced comfort and flexibility. Made from Polyurethane foam that is breathable, conducts heat efficiently, has great shape retention and shock absorbency for continued comfort.
Developed with SATRA—SATRA contributed to the development of the ThermaCELL Heated Insoles ProFLEX model, including extensive testing on durability and heating performance.
For more information about both Heated Insoles products, visit www.thermacell.com or call 1-866-753-3837.

Slide background
St. Croix Triumph X...Just Call it the “Cool Tool"

Just Call it the “Cool Tool”

Triumph X backs its sporty, confident looks with the performance you expect from St. Croix

Park Falls, WI (November 24, 2014) – Even in fishing, style sells. In a sport where product performance should be the ultimate measure – even the deciding factor in sealing the deal at the cash register – looks do matter. Regrettably, some rod makers prey on this premise by putting “lipstick on the pig.”

Fortunately, there are proud, legacy manufacturers like St. Croix Rod who embrace the coolness factor while never succumbing to cheapness.

While visually alluring, even radical in appearance, St. Croix’s new Triumph X rod series owns its price-range in quality and performance. But long before the vibrant, airbrushed colors visually distinguish Triumph X from surrounding rods on the rack, technology and decades of advanced St. Croix engineering underpin its stature.

Beneath the striking burnt-orange and purplish-black façade is an SCII graphite blank that begs to accompany a more expensive rod. But at a hundred bucks, Triumph X is a triumph in blank construction at a reasonable price.

Component wise, the Triumph X features an EVA split-grip handle – again, a feat for the dollars. Split-grip practitioners embrace the progressive design’s balanced casting, comfort and lessened overall weight. Triumph X users will appreciate said benefits, which were once reserved for more expensive rods.

Fuji® DPS or ECS reel seat with black hood(s) complement the blank cosmetics while providing all-day casting comfort. Hard aluminum-oxide guides set in distinctive black frames support casting distance while holding up to the rigors of the sport. And this while precision-wound thread-wraps are safely situated beneath two coats of Flex Coat slow-cure finish.

All 12 spinning and casting rods in the Triumph X series are cultured for outstanding strength, sensitivity and hook-setting power. And amongst those dozen members are select rods for targeting bass, walleyes, pike, panfish and whatever else swims across your path.

Backed by a 5-year warranty and St. Croix’s celebrated Superstar Service, your affordably priced Triumph X rod doubles as a capital investment.

The Triumph X series is designed and engineered in Park Falls, Wisconsin, and handcrafted in St. Croix’s advanced facility in Fresnillo, Mexico. They retail for $90 to $100.

Slide background
Compact units pack a huge punch, offer anglers widescreen color display and pro features at an equally attractive price point EUFAULA, AL. (November 21, 2014) – Continuing with the trend of offering anglers more features at a compelling value, Humminbird® is proud to announce the launch of HELIX™, a family of compact-format fishfinders that feature a best-in-class, widescreen color display and powerful, professional-grade features. For years, many anglers have been fishing in a box, limited to fish- and structure-viewing on a screen that doesn’t fully capture the breadth of the underwater landscape – landscape being the operative word. Hence, Humminbird’s recent shift to a 5-inch diagonal 800H x 480V screen 256-color TFT display that recalls the 16:9 aspect ratio of HDTV, but in a more compact format. “Over the years, anglers have told us that they love our 800 and 900 Series units because of the screen orientation. Especially for technologies like our patented Side Imaging™, the landscape orientation maximizes the number of horizontal pixels for optimal detail and easy viewing,” says Humminbird Brand Manager, Jeff Kolodzinski. For first-time electronics buyers, the getting has never been so good. Anglers on limited budgets now have access to incredible fish-finding features with minimal investment. HELIX offers the highest resolution of any fishfinder in their price category. “These aren’t just amazingly priced units, they are amazing units at any price,” says Humminbird Sr. Product Manager, John Luther. MEET THE FAMILY The HELIX family currently comprises five models to meet the individual needs of anglers and boaters. All units feature X-Press Menu System keypad control, 800H x 480V 5-inch 256-color TFT display, and allow for gimbal mounting, or in-dash mounting with optional kit. International models support 200/50 kHz. Optional 50 kHz transducers are available for extreme deep-water use. HELIX 5 SONAR Designed for the angler/boater who requires DualBeam PLUS Sonar only. Included XNT 9 20 T transducer with 200/83 kHz frequencies for 20- and 60-degree coverage, respectively. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. 1500 feet depth capability. *Also available in a portable model, HELIX 5 SONAR PT (Portable), which includes Humminbird shuttle and case. HELIX 5 DI Designed for the angler who requires DualBeam PLUS Sonar and Down Imaging®. Included XNT 9 DI T transducer features 455/800/200/455 kHz frequencies for 16-, 28-, 45- and 75-degree coverage. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. 600 feet depth-capable sonar; Down Imaging, 350 feet. HELIX 5 SONAR – GPS Offers DualBeam PLUS Sonar and GPS chartplotting with internal GPS receiver for 2,500 waypoints, 45 routes, 50 tracks and 20,000 waypoints. Includes Humminbird UniMap base maps and is compatible with Humminbird LakeMaster® charts, including AutoChart™. Navionics® Gold/HotMaps™ compatible. Included XNT 9 20 T transducer with 200/83 kHz frequencies for 20- and 60-degree coverage, respectively. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. GPS speed included. 1500 feet depth capability. *Also available in a portable model, HELIX 5 SONAR – GPS PT (Portable), which includes Humminbird shuttle and case. HELIX 5 DI – GPS Functionality includes DualBeam PLUS Sonar, GPS chartplotting with internal GPS receiver and Down Imaging®. Includes Humminbird UniMap base maps and is compatible with Humminbird LakeMaster® charts, including AutoChart™. Navionics® Gold/HotMaps™ compatible. Included XNT 9 DI T transducer features 455/800/200/455 kHz frequencies for 16-, 28-, 45- and 75-degree coverage. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. GPS speed included. 600 feet depth-capable sonar; Down Imaging®, 350 feet. HELIX 5 SI – GPS The flagship unit of the HELIX family features DualBeam PLUS Sonar, GPS chartplotting with internal GPS receiver, Down Imaging®, and Side Imaging®. Includes Humminbird UniMap base maps and is compatible with Humminbird LakeMaster® charts, including AutoChart™ and AutoChart™ Pro. Navionics® Gold/HotMaps™ compatible. Included XNT 9 SI 180 T transducer features 200/83/455 kHz frequencies for 20-, 60-, and (2) 85-degree angles of coverage. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. GPS speed included. 1500 feet depth-capable sonar; Down Imaging®, 350 feet; Side imaging®, 100 feet, left and right. *Also available in the Kevin VanDam Signature Series as HELIX 5 SI – GPS KVD.
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background